Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-energy rays or particles to kill cancer cells. Radiation may be used:

  • As the first treatment for low-grade cancer that is still just in the prostate gland. Cure rates for men with these types of cancers are about the same as those for men getting radical prostatectomy.
  • As part of the first treatment (along with hormone therapy) for cancers that have grown outside of the prostate gland and into nearby tissues.
  • If the cancer is not removed completely or comes back (recurs) in the area of the prostate after surgery.
  • If the cancer is advanced, to reduce the size of the tumor and to provide relief from present and possible future symptoms.

The 2 main types of radiation therapy are external beam radiation and brachytherapy (internal radiation). Both appear to be good methods of treating prostate cancer, although there is more long-term information about the results with external beam radiation.

External beam radiation therapy (EBRT)

In EBRT, beams of radiation are focused on the prostate gland from a machine outside the body. This type of radiation can be used to try to cure earlier stage cancers, or to help relieve symptoms such as bone pain if the cancer has spread to a specific area of bone.

Before treatments start, imaging tests such as MRIs, CT scans, or plain x-rays of the pelvis are done to find the exact location of your prostate gland. The radiation team may then make some ink marks on your skin that they will use later as a guide to focus the radiation in the right area.

You will usually be treated 5 days a week in an outpatient center for about 7 to 9 weeks. Each treatment is much like getting an x-ray. The radiation is stronger than that used for an x-ray, but the procedure is painless. Each treatment lasts only a few minutes, although the setup time — getting you into place for treatment — takes longer.

Newer EBRT techniques focus the radiation more precisely on the tumor. This let doctors give higher doses of radiation while reducing the radiation exposure to nearby healthy tissues.

Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT)

3D-CRT uses special computers to precisely map the location of your prostate. Radiation beams are then shaped and aimed at the prostate from several directions, which makes it less likely to damage normal tissues. You will most likely be fitted with a plastic mold resembling a body cast to keep you in the same position each day so that the radiation can be aimed more accurately. This method seems to be at least as effective as standard radiation therapy with lower side effects.

Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

IMRT, an advanced form of 3D therapy, is the most common method of EBRT for prostate cancer. It uses a computer-driven machine that actually moves around the patient as it delivers radiation. Along with shaping the beams and aiming them at the prostate from several angles, the intensity (strength) of the beams can be adjusted to limit the dose reaching the most sensitive normal tissues. This lets doctors deliver an even higher dose to the cancer.

Some newer radiation machines have imaging scanners built into them. This advance, known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), lets the doctor take pictures of the prostate and make minor adjustments in aiming just before giving the radiation. This may help deliver the radiation even more precisely, which might result in fewer side effects, although more research is needed to prove this.Another approach is to place tiny implants into the prostate that send out radio waves to tell the radiation therapy machines where to aim. This lets the machine adjust for movement (like during breathing) and may allow less radiation to go to normal tissues. In theory, this could lower side effects. So far, though, no study has shown side effects to be lower with this approach than with other forms of IMRT. The machines that use this are known as Calypso®.

A variation of IMRT is called volumetric modulated arc therapy. It uses a machine that delivers radiation quickly as it rotates once around the body. This allows each treatment to be given over just a few minutes. Although this can be more convenient for the patient, it hasn’t yet been shown to be more effective than regular IMRT.

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)

This technique uses advanced image guided techniques to deliver large doses of radiation to a certain precise area, such as the prostate. Because there are large doses of radiation in each dose, the entire course of treatment is given over just a few days.

SBRT is often known by the names of the machines that deliver the radiation, such as Gamma Knife®, X-Knife®, CyberKnife®, and Clinac®.

The main advantage of SBRT over IMRT is that the treatment takes less time (days instead of weeks). The side effects, though, are not better.

Proton beam radiation therapy

Proton beam therapy focuses beams of protons instead of x-rays on the cancer. Unlike x-rays, which release energy both before and after they hit their target, protons cause little damage to tissues they pass through and release their energy only after traveling a certain distance. This means that proton beam radiation can, in theory, deliver more radiation to the prostate while doing less damage to nearby normal tissues. Proton beam radiation can be aimed with similar techniques to 3D-CRT and IMRT.

Although early results are promising, so far studies have not shown that proton beam therapy is safer or more effective than other types of EBRT for treating prostate cancer. Right now, proton beam therapy is not widely available. The machines needed to make protons are very expensive, and they aren’t available in many centers in the United States. Proton beam radiation might not be covered by all insurance companies at this time.